Thursday, July 15, 2021

Restoration of the Lincoln Statue

Pictured: The 1988 Lincoln Statue Restoration Project      

    Restoration has begun on the Lincoln Statue after delays last year due to COVID-19.  The company hired to do the restoration is Russell-Marti Conservation, Inc. from California, Mo.

    The last conservation treatment was in 1998.  At that time, the statue was cleaned of corrosion with glass beads, and then given a hot chemical patina, followed by successive applications of protective coatings. 

Pictured: Lincoln Statue Prior to the 1998 Restoration


    General treatment step this time will be:

1.)  Remove all loose, deteriorated coatings from the surface by cleaning with CO2 (carbon dioxide, or dry ice) blasting.  The CO2 cleaning method was used as part of recent conservation/maintenance treatments in St. Louis, including the Apotheosis of St. Louis (in front of the St. Louis Art Museum), the Meeting of the Waters (at Aloe Plaza, across from Union Station) and on sculptures at the St. Louis Art Museum.

2.)  Wash the bronze, using water and non-ionic surfactant, rinse and dry.

3.)  Apply a clear lacquer by spray, building up the coating in successive thin applications.

4.)  Apply a toning layer to adjust the patina as necessary

5.)  Apply a final clear lacquer.

    While conservation treatment will stabilize the sculpture and bring it to an appropriate and well cared for appearance, routing annual maintenance is important to preserve the effect of the treatment over the long term.

    The Lincoln Statue was donated to the City of Bunker Hill in 1904 by Capt. Charles Clinton.  Most of the men in Capt. Clinton's Civil War Unit were men from Bunker Hill.  He had such high regard for these men that he decided to donate a statue of Lincoln identical to the one which he donated to his hometown of Cincinnati, OH.  There are two other statues in Iowa, but they do not have the Lady Liberty.  These statues were donated by other individuals.  All of the statues were sculpted by William Granville Hastings.

Further information about the History of our Lincoln Statue can be found on our blog posting at https://bunkerhillhistory.blogspot.com/2015/01/lincolns-statue.html

Pictured: The 1988 Lincoln Statue Restoration Project

Pictured: The 1988 Lincoln Statue Restoration Project

...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette News, July 15, 2021.  

Thursday, July 8, 2021

The Bunker Hill Train Wreck of August 1857

Pictured: Hotel and Big Four Railroad Station in Bunker Hill IL
 

From the Missouri Democrat of the 17th

On Saturday evening, about eight o'clock, as the westward bound passenger train on the Terre Haute, Alton, and St. Louis railroad had reached a point about one mile from Bunker Hill, IL, the locomotive broke through a bridge, which was constructed over a small creek or ravine.  The baggage and express cars were, at the same time, precipitated beyond the engine and down a steep embankment.

The car next to the emigrant car, containing a number of ladies and gentlemen, fell in after the engine and was turned up on its forward end.  At the time of the accident, a hard thunderstorm was prevailing, which added to the terror of the occasion.  Another thing which contributed to the dismay of the passengers was the communication of fire to a portion of the train by the explosion of the engine.  The flames, notwithstanding the rain, were spreading rapidly, but by the exertion of the passengers were subdued.

Edward Warden, fireman, was instantly killed.  Mr. Wilcox, engineer was badly hurt and burned.  The baggage master of the train, whose name we were unable to obtain, and B. Deming, a brakeman, were hurt, but not seriously.

As if the heavens had conspired to add terror and death to the scene, a little girl, daughter of Mr. Templer, was struck by lightning just after the explosion of the engine took place, and was instantly killed.

Edward Warden died on August 16, 1857, and is buried in the Bunker Hill Cemetery.

...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, July 8, 2021.  

Thursday, May 13, 2021

"Carrie was There" - A Caregiver to Many

 

Pictured: Carrie Braash

This article was submitted by Carol DuFrain, granddaughter of Carrie Braash

    When my grandmother's name is mentioned in this area, someone usually recalls a time when "Carrie was there".  She was involved with many families on the occasion of the birth of a son or daughter and, in this way, was an important part of the history of this area.

    She was well known for assisting Dr. Bley and Dr. Hess with home deliveries and the aftercare of the mother and baby.  According to a record kept by her, she cared for over 350 babies over a 23 year period.  The first baby noted was Irma Bartels in 1921 and the last was Joyce Adcock in 1944.  There were some years in the 1930's when she helped with as many as 40 in one year.

    She became a widow with three small children in 1917 when my grandfather, Charles, passed away.  She moved to Bunker Hill in 1929.  Her children were Dorothy, Marcella, and Otto.  She had four grandchildren and raised one of them from age three.

    She was also known for her beautiful quilts and her work as a member of Zion  Lutheran Church.  She is fondly remembered by many for her kindness and "always being there" to lend a helping hand.

    Carrie passed away in 1965 at the age of 80.  A great-granddaughter she never new bears her name.

...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, May 13, 2021.  

Thursday, March 18, 2021

Bunker Hill Digs Out in Cold, Dismal Sunday Rain

Pictured: Washington Street in the Bunker Hill Business District resembled the set of a Hollywood disaster film after a tornado struck on March 19, 1948.  Nineteen people were killed and almost every building in town was damaged or destroyed. (File/The State Journal Register)

Read more about the Bunker Hill Tornado in our March 19, 2020 blog posting at https://bunkerhillhistory.blogspot.com/2020/03/72-years-ago-march-19-1948-tornado.html and also  our November 2015 blog at https://bunkerhillhistory.blogspot.com/2015/11/bunker-hill-tornado-67th-anniversary.html

From the Alton Telegraph, March 20 and 22, 1948

    In a cold and dismal rain that began falling yesterday, efforts continued in the little town of Bunker Hill to open streets and clear debris from around dwellings that could be used as shelters.  This is the second time in "10 days less than 10 years" that a tornado struck the town which is the center of a dairy and farming community.  The town was established about 1835 and until the tornado of 10 years ago, a storm of such proportions had never swept the locality.

Pictured: Bunker Hill Main Business Area - This photo taken Saturday morning after debris had been cleared from the streets shows the damage done to the city's business areas.  Roofs were torn off and buildings demolished by the hard-hitting tornado.

    Sightseers have been barred since the militia took over mid-afternoon Saturday.  Route 112 (now 159), two miles north of the city limits at the spur connecting with Route 138, was patrolled by State Police, who were helped in their efforts to let only those with legitimate business enter the town by long time residents of the community.  Stories were listened to and only those with a compelling reason were given the nod to drive on.  All other roads are barricaded and patrolled against unnecessary traffic.
Pictured: Toppled Abraham Lincoln Statue

    Headquarters for John Ritter, assistant chief, State Police, have set up in a trailer in the parking space on Route 112 in the mid-section of the business district.  It stands only a few feet from the base of the statue of Abraham Lincoln.  The statue itself, almost life size, is lying headless against the north side of the base, when it toppled backward early Friday morning.  On the south side kneels the figure of a woman with hand posed, as in writing, but without the pencil, that was formerly hers, who is ready to complete the sentence, "With malice toward none."

Pictured: Salvation Army tents

Pictured: Salvation Army assisting Bunker Hill residents

    A few feet to the north of the statue, is the tent, where help is administered by the Salvation Army.  Military personnel and citizens alike were loud in their praise of "The Army".  The Red Cross headquarters is established in the Meissner High School building, where the roof, badly damaged, admitted the pouring rain.  A first aid station functioned there after the tornado and remains to continue further efforts if needed.  Various desks and offices to house records and equipment for the management of the huge task, occupy hall space and parts of other rooms, wherever a small space can be found.  A registered nurse, Miss Phyllis Baker, and a high school music teacher, Mr. Pal Byron Hale, a medical corpsman in World War II, aided Dr. C.W. Draper and Dr. Lusk of Carlinville, in setting up an aid station at Meissner High School, where 74 patients were registered.  Doctors estimated that 150 had been treated at the school, a home, a business district store, and the three aid centers.  Six dead lay in one room of the school awaiting the coroner.  Arrival of the coroner and additional State Police was a welcome relief for Mrs. Ethel Herndon, who stood guard at the door of the improvised morgue. 



Pictured: Meissner School set up as a Red Cross Headquarters

    The once proud town, with its wealth of historical background, is leveled.  Only the school building stands among the major building, and a few of the houses are habitable.  but with agencies of the government and charity converging on the town, it was digging its way out.

...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, March 18, 2021.  

Thursday, February 25, 2021

Smalleytown and Pleasant Hill Schools

Pictured: Smalleytown School in 1900's 

Smalleytown School #162

Smalleytown School was located on Miles Station Road, Bunker Hill Township in Section #3.

In 1906, Mrs Frances (Smalley) Pennington was the teacher and she had 24 students and her salary was $40 per month.

Pictured: Smalleytown School Class (circa 1906 or 1907)
Front row: Lester Smith, Frank Smith, Lydia Heal Dey, Billy Bort, Bertha Peters Stammer, Goldie Peters Rull, Bessie Marston.
Middle row: Lester Heal, Henry Smith, Mildred Wood Lloyd, Beulah Barnes Olmsted, Elsie Bort Schaller, Ferna Jacobi, Della Peters Buhs, Annie Bort.
Back row: Chester Kehr, Harry Jones, Rose Peters Penning, Van Jacobi, Francis Smalley Pennington (teacher), Oliver Marston, Viva Wood Leggett, Milton Jacobi.

In 1919, Edith Pyle was the teacher and she had five students.  Edith Pyle received $50 per month.

In 1921, Charles F. Keirle was the teacher and he had five students.  Mr. Keirle received $75 per month.

In 1922, Mrs. Gladys Smith was the teacher and she had six students.  She received $75 per month.

In 1944-45, the school had a radio and warm lunch programs heated on an electric plate.  The last annual report was 1947-48 and the last teacher was Mrs. Laura Snedeker.  When the school closed, the students had a choice of where to go.  Three girls chose Woodburn School and the three boys went to Bunker Hill.

Some of the many families who attended Smalleytown Schools were Olmsted, Howald, Pennington, Barnes, Bort, Jacobi, McCurdy, Heal, and Brummer.


Pictured: Map for Bunker Hill area Country Schools


Pictured: Pleasant Hill School #165

Pleasant Hill School #165

Pleasant Hill School was located in Bunker Hill Township in Section #26.  Today, that is Rust Road.

In 1907-08, Mary Aveiss, teacher, had 25 students and received #35 per month.  The tuition for each student per month was $1.40.  In Mary Aveiss' teachers report, she stated that the blackboards needed repairing badly.  Chicken pox and bad roads had a lot to do with the poor attendance.  The schoolhouse is very much in need of repair.  I, with the help of a 12-year old boy, built a little porch to keep the mud at least a short distance from the door.

In 1920-21, Chester Kehr was the teacher.  There were 15 students and Mr. Kehr received $85 per month.

In 1924-25, Miss Claribel Seim was the teacher.  She had 13 students and received $74 per month.  The school director was Anton Bruckert.

Some of the many families that attended Pleasant Hill School throughout the years were Rust, Haneghan, Zarges, Sauerwein, Goebel, Bunte, Enke, Ladenforf, Bixen, Bruckert, Duelm, Goodwin, Foreman, Altevogt, and Moulton.

Pictured: 1918 Pleasant Hill School Class

...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, February 25, 2021. 

Redford, Carol, and Betty Triplett. "Bunker Hill History." In Reflections: A History of the Bunker Hill-Woodburn Area, p. 100. Bunker Hill: Bunker Hill Publications, 1993. Provided by the Bunker Hill Historical Society.

Thursday, January 21, 2021

The Millville School #163

Pictured: Millville School #163
Teacher Gertrude Love pictured on the right, along with her sister and cousin.

    Millville School was located in the area of Mansholt Road and North East Streets in Section 12 of Bunker Hill Township.

    In 1911, teacher Gertrude Love made $40/month and had 22 students.  In 1920, the schools was listed as a brick building with six windows.  The students had new desks and sold buttons at 10 cents each to buy books for the new library.

Pictured: Map of Bunker Hill area Country Schools

    Some of the many families that attended Millville Schools through the years were Rose, Farris, Keirle, Gosch, Rull, and Acuncius.

Millville School was sold July 8, 1950 to LaVerne Gosch and used for a home.


...Read this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, January 21, 2021.

Redford, Carol, and Betty Triplett. "Bunker Hill History." In Reflections: A History of the Bunker Hill-Woodburn Area, p. 99. Bunker Hill: Bunker Hill Publications, 1993. Provided by the Bunker Hill Historical Society.

Thursday, January 7, 2021

Luken School #160

Pictured: Luken School #160

    Luken School was located on Highway 138, halfway between Bunker Hill and Dorchester.  In 1907, there was a different teacher for each semester; pay was $30-$35 a month.

    In 1909, there was still no library because the books were destroyed by people who slept in the school.  By 1915, the school had 38 books, blackboards, and slates.

Pictured: Luken School Class Photo in 1932
Teacher: Edna Wohlert (in back), 
Left row (from front): Elveta Mae Sauerwein Schaffer, Evelyn Rose Landreth, Elvera June Sauerwein Baldridge, Elroy Meyers.
Middle Row: Jack Benjey, Norman (Butch) Rull, Jewell Benjey Sanderson, Opal Mae Johnson Welch.
Right row: Charles Benjey, Verna Rull Brackenhoff, Vernadine Sauerwein Fleming.
--Submitted by Evelyn Rose Landreth

    In 1944-45, three students were transported to Dorchester #135 and to Bunker Hill #164, which was Meissner School.  The building was destroyed in the 1948 tornado.


Pictured: Map of Bunker Hill area Country Schools

    Some of the family names who attended Luken School were: Bohlmeyer, Knoche, Jarman, Johnson, Rose, Sauerwein, Wieseman, and Scheldt, many attended during the years.

...Read this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, January 7, 2021.

Redford, Carol, and Betty Triplett. "Bunker Hill History." In Reflections: A History of the Bunker Hill-Woodburn Area, p. 99. Bunker Hill: Bunker Hill Publications, 1993. Provided by the Bunker Hill Historical Society.