Friday, November 14, 2014

The Civil War Soldier's Memorial - 1869


The Civil War Soldier's Memorial - 1869
A monument to Civil War Soldiers was erected in the Bunker Hill Cemetery in 1866 at great expense to local contributors and was highly prized for many years.  It was the scene of patriotic memorial programs, including this one photographed in May 1869.  
Identity of some were noted by numbers, barely visible, on the individuals:
1)E. W. Hayes; 
2)Dr. Brother; 
3)W. O. Jencks; 
4)James True; 
5)James Feeney; 
6)James McPherson; 
7)Sam Smith; 
8)John Brandenburger; 
9)Clark Burton; 
11)John Knibb; 
12)Hans Hansen; 
13)Speaker; 
14)Mr. Eagleson; 
15)John Hayes.  
Photo from the collection of Frances Stadelman

...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at http://bunkerhillhistory.org

--Provided by The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society.

The Bunker Hill Soldier's Monument




The Soldier's Monument
On November 11, 1865, the preliminary steps were taken for a soldier's monument to be placed in the cemetery in Bunker Hill.

The soldier's monument was erected in 1866 and is dedicated to the memory of the brave men who lost their lives in the Civil War.  For many years, Memorial Day military tribute has been paid to veterans of all wars in ceremonies held at the base of the monument.

On three sides are the names of the men who died in the Civil War, the place where they died, and the cause of death.

The work of putting back the fallen monument after the tornado of 1948 was done by Floyd Spickerman, James Vaughn, and Malvern Allen.  A gin pole, blocks and tackle, and plenty of rope was employed to hoist the heavy stones.  Burlap sacks were placed under the ropes to keep them from being cut on the sharp corners of the stones.  The big pieces, which caused the men no little concern, was taken up in five hitches, using a tractor for power to pull the two blocks hitched to a sling on the stone.  

The monument suffered rather badly in the tornado.  The center section, bearing a coat of arms, was broken on one corner and the lower spire and foundation was also chipped and broken.  The eagle lost a large part of its tail and left wing in its flight to the ground.

The engraving on the monument is:
To the memory of
The brave men
Who died in the service of their Country
During the war
For the suppression of the slave holders'
Rebellion of 1861
This monument is erected
by their fellow citizens
1866


...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at http://bunkerhillhistory.org

--Cite this story:  The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." BUNKER HILL GAZETTE-NEWS, August 23, 2012, sec. 1. Republished 13 November 2014.

Monday, November 10, 2014

The Bunker Hill Armistice Day Parade - 1918


Armistice Day, 1918, a joyful occasion and the townspeople of Bunker Hill celebrated the ending of the "War to end all wars".  


Pictured are Bill Baker and Otto Brummer, who drove this flag-draped truck in an Armistice Day Parade.

While that day is gone and all but forgotten, it can be relived from the pictures taken that day.  They are the property of Mrs. Carl (Vivian) Roberts of Gillespie who was a young girl at the time.  She does not remember who took the pictures but that she did not for she wanted to be beside her mother, who was honored that day as one of the two leaders of the local Red Cross group.


The Red Cross workers gathered on Washington Street for their photograph.  Mrs. Thomas Baker and Mrs. Ed Campbell wore the red headgear because they were the local Red Cross leaders.  

Mrs. Roberts thought that some local residents might remember some of the people pictured and get enjoyment from them.  Most of her family pictures were lost in the two tornadoes, 1930 and 1948 which struck Bunker Hill.  Most of their pictures were lost at that time.



  


The Baker residence (Mrs. Roberts maiden name was Baker and she was a sister to "Bill" and "Tommy" Baker) was located on South Washington, and after the second tornado, the location was given to Thomas Baker, who built the Sharon Theater there and which is now the location of Bunker Hill Auto Parts.

...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at http://bunkerhillhistory.org

--Cite this story:  The Bunker Hill Historical Society, "Photos Taken During Armistice Day, 1918 Parade in Bunker Hill" The Bunker Hill Gazette-News 29 January 1986.
   

Armistice Day


Pictured are Bill Baker and Otto Brummer, who drove this flag-draped truck in the 1918 Bunker Hill IL Armistice Day Parade.

Veterans' Day is an annual holiday held every November 11.  World War I ended with the signing of the Armistice on November 11, 1918 between Germany and the Allies, together with the United States.  In 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower changed the name to Veterans' Day and dedicated it to the sacrifice made by all United States veterans.

...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at http://bunkerhillhistory.org

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill Historical Society, "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." The Bunker Hill Gazette-News 06 November. 2014.