Wednesday, May 18, 2022

W.B. Powell Tells of Coming to Bunker Hill, Buying Paper

Pictured: Bunker Hill Gazette-News on NW corner of E. Warren and N. Pine St.
Was the former Chas. Folkerts Grocery Store  

    In the September 13, 1940 issue of the Gazette news, the 75th anniversary issue, a letter from W.B. Powell tells about the beginning of the Gazette news.  Mr. Powell, former editor of the paper, then the Bunker Hill News, is the man responsible for merging that paper with the rival Gazette.

    "One bright Sunday, sometime in 1903 or 1904," Mr. Powell began, "I went to Bunker Hill on an excursion that ran out of St. Louis.  I bought some of Louie Bartels' peanut candy.  If it hadn't been for that candy, Bunker Hill would never have had the distinction of my presence."

    "I resigned from the managership of Nugents' mail order department, a St. Louis concern doing a two million dollar a year business, and with a few manipulations with a newspaper broker, with offices in Litchfield, I found myself owner of the Bunker Hill News, located in a two-story brick building back of Sessel's Store, and over Barth's Harness Shop."

    From the building, Mr. Powell could smell Louis Bartels' candy cooking, but there was little else to recommend the plant he had purchased sight unseen.

    "The presses and make up stones were in the rear of the loft and the type cases in front and between the two there was space for a basketball court."

    The paper also had 125 subscribers and a broken job press.  Full page ads were sold for $5 an issue.  Mr. Powell bought new equipment, rented another building, hired a staff, and two weeks later published an issue of the Bunker Hill News.

    Within a few weeks, Mr. Powell bought out his competitor, the Gazette for $1,000.  This was the beginning of the Bunker Hill Gazette-News.

    From 100 subscribers, the number rose to 1,600.  Mr. Powell bought the Dorchester Hustler and merged it with the Gazette-News.

    It wasn't all quite that smooth going.  Once, as a result of a religious war in Bunker Hill, women cancelled their subscriptions and made the husbands cancel their advertising.  However, Powell's faithful friends, the German dairymaen of the area, ordered two subscriptions for every one that was cancelled and forced out of business, a man who cancelled his advertisement, the whole thing blew over and the Gazette-news came out on top.

...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, May 19, 2022.  

Thursday, May 12, 2022

Gazette has Roots in Staunton and Gillespie

Pictured: Bunker Hill Gazette-News on SW corner of N. Washington and W. Fayette St.

    The Staunton Banner first appeared March 8, 1858, owned and edited by Parsons Percy, who bought the office from Monroe County.  He continued publication until 1860 when it was purchased and removed to Gillespie by A.W. Edwards, and in November of 1860 the first issued appeared in Gillespie as the Union and Gazette.  This paper continued under Edwards until 1863 when Edwards enlisted in the Union Army.  The publication continued for sometime afterwards by Alonzo James, but when he enlisted, the publication was suspended.

    The first Newspaper printed in Bunker Hill was the Bunker Hill Journal, five column paper with E.J. Bronson as editor and publisher.  The first issue was December 8, 1859 and the last in May 1860.

    When Edwards returned from the war in 1865, he moved the printing office from Gillespie to Bunker Hill, and resumed the publication as the Union-Gazette, with the first issue being published January 19, 1866.

Edwards continued publication until January 31, 1867 when he sold to Dr. A.R. Sawyer and F.Y. Hedley.  Dr. Sawyer died in May 1867.  In 1871, the name of the paper was changed with the word Union dropping out.

    Hedley continued as editor and proprietor until January 1, 1878, when W.S. Silence became editor.  This arrangement continued until January 24, 1879 when it was leased to Mr. Said and Mr. Poorran of Charleston, who published until July 1879.  At that time, Hedley, then the postmaster, resumed the editorship.

...Read this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, May 12, 2022.

Thursday, May 5, 2022

The "Not So Warm" Welcome of President Andrew Johnson

Pictured: Big Four Depot
 

A reprint of our blog from Oct., 9, 2014... https://bunkerhillhistory.blogspot.com/2014/10/president-andrew-johnson-hooted-during.html

From the Bunker Hill Union Gazette September 14, 1866

President Andrew Johnson Hooted During Train Stop in Bunker Hill

    Quite a large collection of people were at the depot on the arrival of the special train at 9:40 on Monday morning.  Bunker Hill, true to her instincts and past record, offered no insult to President Johnson and only showing their abhorrence of him by their prolonged cheers for General Grant and Admiral Farragut (with Lincoln's assassination, Vice President Andrew Johnson became President).

    The President of the United States, Andrew Johnson, was introduced by John Hogan; three cheers were given which he acknowledge [Sic] by taking off his hat and was about to leave with us the Constitution and the Stars and Stripes, when a gentleman proposed three cheers for General Grant, three cheers for Admiral Farragut, and three cheers for the Congress.  President Johnson again attempted to speak, but the cries for Grant compelled him to forgo.

Mr. Hogan proposed three cheers for the Thirty-Six States, which were given and then someone fired a pistol in the crowd, which disturbed the nerves of the party.  The train moved off and, as far as the eye could reach, the humble individual with hat in hand was bowing to the right and left, poor President Johnson.  We sympathize with Grant and Farragut in their forced company.

Pictured: The Big Four Depot (circa 1939)


...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, May 5, 2022.  

Redford, Carol, and Betty Triplett. "Bunker Hill History." In Reflections: A History of the Bunker Hill-Woodburn Area, p. 35. Bunker Hill: Bunker Hill Publications, 1993. Provided by the Bunker Hill Historical Society.

Thursday, April 28, 2022

National Defense Class in Electricity Wires Oldest House in Community

 

Pictured is the Joe Jarden Home

From the Bunker Hill Gazette News: February 20, 1941

     The first unit of the National Defense Training Program offered in Farm Mechanics Shop at the local high school completed an eight week course this week with the wiring of a barn and complete layout of out buildings for Frank Gerdes, and the wiring and installation of fixtures in the Al Goodwin farm house.

    According to Edward J. Barnes, instructor, the class gained some valuable experience through difficult wiring in the Al Goodwin Home;  the back part of which was a Drover Hotel on the trail between St. Louis and Springfield.  No one knows what year the hotel was built, however, Goodwin can trace it back to 1834, and it was not a new building at that time.  The part of the dwelling which was the old hotel is of log construction, with the walls packed with mud, bound together by chopped prairie grass and hickory sticks.

    As related to the class by Mr. Goodwin, there are many pioneer stories connected with the old hotel.  Mr. Goodwin has in his possession a tax receipt amounting to forty cents which was the annual property tax on the old hotel and accompanying 160 acre farm.  Taxes at that time were paid in Edwardsville.

    Members of the class wiring the historic building were Oscar Boettger, Melvin Buhs, Harold Brueggeman, Stanley Dana, Victor Dubbelde, Albert Fahrenkrog, Harvey Howerton, Ralph Huette, Alfred Jacobi, Daniel Mancini, Kenneth Mansholt, Arnold Oldenettle, Elmer Oldenettle, Chester Rull, and Leland Scroggins.

    This property was owned by Lillian Goodwin Jarden and is the home of her son, Joe.

...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, April 28, 2022.  

Redford, Carol, and Betty Triplett. "Bunker Hill History." In Reflections: A History of the Bunker Hill-Woodburn Area, 50. Bunker Hill: Bunker Hill Publications, 1993. Provided by the Bunker Hill Historical Society.

Stanton, Carl L. . "Bunker Hill News 1918." In Bunker Hill Revisited, Volume Seven, 1941-1948, p. 2. Bunker Hill: Bunker Hill Publications, 2004. Provided by the Bunker Hill Historical Society.


Thursday, April 21, 2022

Truesdale, MO Founder Memorial Dedication Ceremony held in Bunker Hill

 

Pictured is the headstone of William Truesdale in the Bunker Hill Cemetery

From the Bunker Hill Gazette:

Truesdale, MO Founder Buried in Bunker Hill     

     On Saturday, April 9, 2022 in the Bunker Hill Cemetery, a memorial headstone was dedicated to honor William Truesdale. 

    Mr. Truesdale was born in Chautauqua County New York on January 9, 1815.  At the age of 12, he was working as an indentured merchant in Erie, PA.  In 1849, he contracted with the Panama Railroad Company to build a railroad across the Isthmus of Panama.

     In 1851, Mr. Truesdale, now married and with a growing family, headed west.  He contracted to build a railroad from Sandoval, IL to St. Louis, MO.  During his years working for the railroad in Missouri, he settled his family in Warren County, MO.  He purchased land (932 acres) and laid out a village.  He made a deal with the North Missouri Railroad to give them land to build a depot and switch yard if they would agree to name the village after him.  In 1857, the first train arrived in Truesdale, MO.

     Although he remained a civilian throughout the Civil War, Mr. Truesdale was referred to as "Colonel" Truesdale.  After the fall of Fort Sumpter, he was appointed as a military superintendent of the North Missouri Railroad.  He was put in charge of the Police and Secret Service under General Rosecrans who was in command of the Army of the Mississippi.

     Mr. Truesdale's 932 acre estate, comprising of most of present Warrenton and Truesdale, MO., was purchased May 19, 1863 by the Methodist Episcopal church as a school and home for orphans of fallen Civil War soldiers.  It was called the Western Orphan Asylum and Educational Institute.  The large house that the Truesdale's lived in became the orphanage.  In 1869, the name changed to Central Wesleyan College and Orphan Asylum.

     In 1864, Mr. Truesdale moved his family to Bunker Hill.  Mr. Truesdale died November 28, 1867.  His wife and children remained here until 1868 when they moved to Pennsylvania to live with her parents.  Buried here in the Bunker Hill Cemetery are Mr. and Mrs. Truesdale, two of their daughters, and three of their grandchildren.

     The city of Truesdale, MO conducted the dedication ceremony.  Guests included the City Hall staff:  Elsa Smith-Fernandez, Missy Bachamp, Elsie Morris, Mark Bennett, and Hal Pherigo. Police Chief Casey Doyle, Truesdale Mayor Chris Watson and Board of Alderman: Joe Brooks, Jerry Cannon, Robert Green, and Mike Thomas.  Mr. Truesdale's ancestor, grandson, Steve Williams from Tennessee and retired Truesdale Administrator and Truesdale Historian Marylou Rainwater.  other guests were also present.

...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society.  "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, April 21, 2022

Thursday, April 7, 2022

History of Round Prairie Christian Church



    The Round Prairie Christian Church organized July 1, 1845 by appointing John P. Bayless and Samuel Wood to the office of Eldership.  Hiram Daughterty [Sic], and John Nesbit were appointed as Deacons at the same time.  About 1849, John W. Keller was added to the list of Elders and Johnson McGilvary and W.S. Spruill were ordained Elders.  Levi Miller and William Nesbit were ordained as Deacons at the same time.

    Johnson McGilvary went off to the Army and died.  In 1874, Peter C. Randle and Albert Fairchild were added to the Eldership and Benjamin Mize and Wm. Soapes to the deaconship.

    Elder Fairchild moved his membership and died  March 12, 1881.  Scott Mize was added to the list of Deacons by the church and Sanford Mize, at the same time, was appointed the same time as an assistant clerk for the church at Round Prairie.  The church continued to add persons to the roll until the membership reached 376.  The church was discontinued about 1918.  --Submitted by Helen Mize.

From Bunker Hill Revisited, Vol. 6, 1920-1940 by Carl Stanton

    March 25, 1932: the site of Round Prairie Christian Church located about 5 or 6 miles Southeast of the City was recently sold and the proceeds distributed to the National City Church at Washington, D.C., the neighboring Christian churches, and to missionaries.  

    While a church has passed, its memory and influence still live.  This congregations was organized on July 31, 1845. Its first officers were John P. Bayless, Samuel Wood, elders, Hiram Daugherty and Jon Nesbit, deacons.  Other office bearers remembered are John Keller, 1849; John McGilvery, W.P. Spruill, 1854; Peter Randle, Albert Fairchild, Benjamin Mize, William Soapes, 1874;  Scott Mize, deacon, 1881; Sanford Mize, clerk.  Trustees who served from 1912 to the date propery was disposed of are: R.N. Nesbit, J.R. Coatney and James Richards.  Early members still living are Mrs. C.A. Craw, Wichita, Kans. 95 years, and Mrs. Margaret Mize Teeters, Kansas City, Mo., age 86.  W.H. Groner, one of the ministers long since dead, who served for 37 years and baptized upward of 400 of its members, is lovingly remembered.

...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, April 7, 2022.  

Stanton, Carl L. . "Bunker Hill News 1932." In Bunker Hill Revisited, Volume Six, 1920-1940, pp. 120. Bunker Hill: Bunker Hill Publications, 2006. Provided by the Bunker Hill Historical Society.

Redford, Carol, and Betty Triplett. "Bunker Hill History." In Reflections: A History of the Bunker Hill-Woodburn Area, p. 123. Bunker Hill: Bunker Hill Publications, 1993. Provided by the Bunker Hill Historical Society.

Thursday, March 31, 2022

History of the Bunker Hill Gazette

Pictured: Bunker Hill Gazette-News on NW corner of E. Warren and N. Pine St.
Was the former Chas. Folkerts Grocery Store

    The press and type of the STAUNTON BANNER were purchased by A.W. Edwards, and in November of 1860 the first number of the Gillespie UNION AND GAZETTE  made its appearance.  The paper continued under Mr. Edwards control until 1863, when he enlisted in the Union Army where he remained until the close of the war.  The publication was, however, continued for some time afterwards by Alonzo James, but he too enlisted and the publication was then suspended.  The UNION AND GAZETTE was extremely Democratic in tone.

    The BUNKER HILL JOURNAL was the name of the first paper published in Bunker Hill.  E.J. Bronson was the editor and proprietor.  It was a five-column folio and was neutral in politics.  The first number was issued December 8, 1859 and the last in May 1860.

    In 1865, after the return of Mr. Edwards from the war, her removed the printing office from Gillespie to Bunker Hill and resumed the publication of the UNION AND GAZETTE.

    The first number was issued January 19, 1866.  He continued the publication until January 31, 1867 when he sold out to Dr. S.R. Sawyer and F.Y. Hedley.  The paper was then Republican in politics.  When Messers Sawyer and Hedley assumed control, they changed the tone and made it independent and it so remained until Dr. Sawyer's death, which event occurred on May 24, 1868.  After that date, it again became Republican in politics and has remained the organ of the Republican party of Bunker Hill to the present time.  In 1871, the name of the paper changed.  The work [Sic] "UNION" was dropped out and from that date to the present it is known as the BUNKER HILL GAZETTE.

    Mr. Hedley continued as editor and proprietor until January 1, 1878 when Mr. W.S. Silence became the publisher, Mr. Hedley still acting as editor.  This arrangement continued until January 24, 1879 when both Hedley and Silence retired and the office was leased to Messers Said and Poorman of Charleston, IL, who published the paper until July 1879.  The circulation of the GAZETTE is about 750.  It is a neat, sprightly paper and enjoyed the confidence of its constituency.  Mr. Headly, who may be regarded as the father of journalism in Bunker Hill, has retired from the active participation of the business but not without first demonstrating his entire capability to run a newspaper successfully.  He is a practical printer, and the GAZETTE, under his management, was a model of typographical neatness.  He is a good writer.  He is now postmaster of this beautiful little city, and as a man and officer, is respected by all who knew him  Mr. Headley resumed editorial charge of the GAZETTE  about the 10th of July, 1879.

    The paper became the GAZETTE-NEWS in 1905 under the association of Philip C. Hansen and W.B. Powell.  At this time, two competing newspapers were combined, the BUNKER HILL NEWS  and the GAZETTE.  Other names of leadership through the years included Harold Gerlach, Arthur and Frieda Strang, and Lawrence Gosch.

    In 1964, the paper was published by Carl Stanton, who remained publisher/editor until 1987, at which time it was sold to John Galer, a Hillsboro, Illinois publisher.

Pictured: Bunker Hill Gazette-News on SW corner of N. Washington and W. Fayette St.

    The GAZETTE-NEWS is published under the name of BUNKER HILL PUBLICATIONS along with the MT. OLIVE HERALD,  the MADISON COUNTY CHRONICLE,  and the SOUTHWESTERN JOURNAL.  Cheri Petroline is the current manager.

...Read this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, March 31, 2022.

Redford, Carol, and Betty Triplett. "Bunker Hill History." In Reflections: A History of the Bunker Hill-Woodburn Area, p. 131. Bunker Hill: Bunker Hill Publications, 1993. Provided by the Bunker Hill Historical Society.

Thursday, March 17, 2022

Bunker Hill City Library

 

Pictured: Bunker Hill Library


From the Bunker Hill Gazette-News October 1950

    The J.H.L. Fahrenkrog building on Warren Street has been purchased by the local library board at a cost of $1,500 and will house the Bunker Hill Library.  (Today, the City of Bunker Hill owns the building which housed the Bunker Hill Historical Society and Museum.

    The Bunker Hill City Library will open for public use Saturday evening, October 7.  The opening will be held although there are some minor details both inside and out of the building yet to be finished.

    The new library is located on East Warren Street and occupies the site of the library and contents that were destroyed in the March 1948 tornado.  Although the building had been completed for some time, opening has been delayed because of the limited budget on which the board has to work.

    Much of the equipment has been donated.  Two desks were given by Dr. and Mrs. George Hess and one each by Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Haxel and Mr. and Mrs. R.E. Rigg.  Some steel cabinet and six chairs have been purchased by the board.  It is pointed out that more chairs are needed and if anyone has some spares they would be gladly accepted for use at the library.

    Some 300 books have also been donated to start off the new library.  Mr. and Mrs. F.A. Wende of Winnetka, IL have given 195 books and others have been given by Mrs. B. Deffenbaugh of St. Louis, MO., and Mrs. Bella Zimmerman of Beloit, WI., who donated a book in memory of her son.

    Mrs. Theo Stone of St. Louis has donated a number of books which she collected there from members of the book club.

    As books come into the library, they are catalogued [sic] by a library committee of which Mrs. O.C. Weidner is chairman.  This committee has received the help of several interested citizens in their work.

    For the opening, six cases of books from the State Library will be on hand.  These are made available on a loan basis.  By receiving books from the state, much good reading is provided for both children and adults.  Miss Loretta Bartels will continues as librarian as she has done for many years in the past.

    The new library building is a modern fireproof structure, with buff brick front.  The interior has been finished in a light green plaster and it is heated with an oil furnace.  Ralph Moxey installed the heating plant free of charge.

    Members of the library board, of which R.E. Rigg is chairman, are Lee Sutton, Walter Heal, Goebel Ladd, max Bertagnolli, Clara Mason, Cora Fensterman, Mr. O.C. Weidner, and Mrs. L.O. Schreier, who is secretary.  Board Committees will be working at the library Thursday and Friday getting ready for opening on Saturday.  At the opening, a free souvenir book markers will be passed out to all who attend.

...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, March 17, 2022.

Redford, Carol, and Betty Triplett. "Bunker Hill History." In Reflections: A History of the Bunker Hill-Woodburn Area, p. 32. Bunker Hill: Bunker Hill Publications, 1993. Provided by the Bunker Hill Historical Society.

Thursday, March 10, 2022

Ed Bruckert's School Buses

Pictured: Bruckerts on NW Corner of N. Washington and W. Fayette St. in 1950



From the Gazette-News March 20, 1952

Each day, some 200 children living outside the City of Bunker Hill are brought to school in four buses.  The mileage they cover on their on their trips averages 230 miles daily.  In a few cases, students drive their own cars to school.

    Ed Bruckert's Garage furnished transportation for the school district, being under contract and receiving payment on the mileage basis.  Bruckert assumes full responsibility for the buses, which he owns, doing his own maintenance and providing drivers for each.  In addition to being a regular driver himself, Bruckert employs the following men, Chester Kehr, Charlie Forrler, and Chester Scroggins.  Alfred Snedeker is an alternate driver.

Prior to 1948, the school maintained their own transportation, owning their bus and employed drivers for the daily trips.  The system proved to be hard to manage properly and was costly in upkeep because of such.  The arrangement with Bruckert was instituted in the fall of 1948 and has been efficient and has provided better service.

In order to facilitate orderly conduct and loading of buses, at the end of the day, classes are dismissed after short intervals to avoid pushing and a big rush which would be likely if they were all turned loose at once.

...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, March 10, 2022. 

Thursday, March 3, 2022

Mercers' Confectionery

 From the Gazette-News - August 1951

    Roger S. Mercer is holding a formal opening of his newly built confectionery on Saturday.  The new business, located between the C.M. Miller Card Co., and "Tickles" Barber Shop, is a fine addition to the business section of town.

    The confectionery is 18 x 50 feet in size and is of concrete block construction.  It has a perma-stone front, done up in brown and white, and is pleasing to the eye.  Another building, east of the confectionery, purchased by Mercer from C.M. Miller, has also been given a perma-stone front.  Equally attractive is the interior of the new building, which has been finished entirely in natural color knotty pine.  All new fixtures have been installed.  These include a large fountain, counter and stools, booths with red and green plastic coverings and a showcase and coolers necessary for the operation of such a business.

    Full kitchen facilities are provided behind a partition toward the rear of the building.  In addition offering smokes, soda, candy and a fountain service, a complete line of sandwiches will also be offered patrons.

    In a statement on his opening Mercer said that it isn't going to be as formal as you might expect in that he has already been pouring coffee and dishing up ice cream for about a week.  Saturday will be the first day the full facilities of the store will be put into operation and he says it will be  "just come as you are".

    Mercer formally operated a similar business across the street from his present location on East Warren Street and without a doubt many of his friends are glad to see him back at his old work.  This newspaper, as we are sure many other people have already cone [Sic],  congratulate him for making such a fine addition to the business district.

...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, March 3, 2022.  

Thursday, February 17, 2022

The Fires of Bunker Hill - pt 2

Pictured: The Bunker Hill Fire Department, date unknown.  Firemen and horses pose before the old fire house which was replaced in the 1940's

Reprint of similar Bunker Hill News article on Jan. 10, 2013 and our May 11, 2015 blog posting at https://bunkerhillhistory.blogspot.com/2015/05/the-fires-of-bunker-hill.html   

From Bunker Hill Revisited Volumes - One and Three    

 

Pictured: Washington St., as viewed from the Opera House corner.  Sanford's south wall on right.

    The fire January 23, 1880, originated in Sanford's Grocery Store on the same ground.  The damage on the fire proper footed up $12,000.  The insurance was fair.[1]

    December 1, 1882, the ground from Bumann's three story building to Sessel's corner and on Warren Street west to the alley, was burned.  The loss totaled $37,000, nearly equally divided between buildings and stock.[1],[2]

These fires occurred on the west side of Washington Street.

Pictured: Warren St. as seen from Klinefelter's store.  Sessel's west wall on right.


    From the Gazette News, September 20, 1893:  On Friday evening, for the third time, fire held a fierce carnival on the west side of Washington Street.  The alarm was given about 6:20 p.m. and within two hours $75,000 worth of the business property in the city had been wiped out.

    The fire originated in the immense barn in the rear of the Johnston block.  It was probably due to the pipe of a tramp or bum, or a cigar of card-playing youngsters.  The facts will never be known.  Almost simultaneously, all buildings south of the Johnston block were ablaze so fiercely that little could be done in the way of saving contents.

    The local fire company did noble work with the fire engine, chemical, and new extinguishers and were nobly seconded by many of our people.  To such effort is due the arrest of the fire at the Johnston block and the saving of the business property on the east side of Washington Street.

    As near as can be ascertained the fire losses were $75,000.  This includes damage to buildings and stocks not destroyed.[3],[4]

Pictured: The old firehouse on West Warren St. used by the local Corps of ground observers in their drills.  The stairway and stage atop the tower were built last year.  The view is taken from east of the building. (photo circa Feb. 3, 1955)


...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, February 17, 2022.

[1]Stanton, Carl L. . "Bunker Hill News 1893." In Bunker Hill Revisited, Volume Three, 1892-1900, p. 62. Bunker Hill: Bunker Hill Publications, 2000. Provided by the Bunker Hill Historical Society.

[2]Stanton, Carl L. . "Bunker Hill News 1882." In Bunker Hill Revisited, Volume Two, 1882-1891, pp. 44-46. Bunker Hill: Bunker Hill Publications, 1999. Provided by the Bunker Hill Historical Society.

[3]Stanton, Carl L. . "Bunker Hill News 1893." In Bunker Hill Revisited, Volume Three, 1892-1900, p. 60-64. Bunker Hill: Bunker Hill Publications, 2003. Provided by the Bunker Hill Historical Society.

[4]Stanton, Carl L. . "Bunker Hill News 1880." In Bunker Hill Revisited, Volume One, 1866-1881, pp. 209-210. Bunker Hill: Bunker Hill Publications, 1997. Provided by the Bunker Hill Historical Society.


Thursday, February 3, 2022

Ordinances of the City of Bunker Hill - 1873


Ordinances of the City of Bunker Hill 

Organized April 15, 1873, under the general law of the State of Illinois

City Officers 1873

Mayor: James F. Cummings

Aldermen for two years: S.A. Fletcher; E.S. Williams; and David Morris

Aldermen for one year: H.H. Brown; C.A. Bartels; and John Gosch

City Clerk: S.N. Sanford

Treasurer: John G. Auer

City Attorney: H.R. Budd

An Ordinance relating to misdemeanors:

Sec. 17: Whoever shall, without the consent of the owner or occupant of the premises, fasten any horse or other animal to any tree or to any boxing place around any tree, shall forfeit and pay the sum of not less that one dollar.

Sec. 19: Whoever shall purposely, rapidly, or immoderately ride or drive any horse or mule, or any cattle, or other like animals, or any team in any street or alley of the City of Bunker Hill shall forfeit and pay for each sum of not less that ten dollars. 

Sec. 37: The running of large cows within the city limits of the City of Bunker Hill, between the 15th day of November and the 1st day of April each year, shall forfeit and pay the sum of one dollar for each cow, and in addition, shall pay the sum of one dollar for every twelve hours said cow shall continue to run at large.

Sec. 42: Any person or persons who shall within the city limits carry any concealed on their persons any knife, Bowie knife, pistol, revolver, slingshot, or any dangerous or deadly weapon for the purpose of unlawfully using the same, shall forfeit and pay the sum of not less than twenty-five dollars.

Sec. 44: That any person or persons who shall ride, lead, or drive any horse, mule, or ox upon or over any plank or brick sidewalk within the city limits shall on conviction thereof, be fined not less than three or more than ten dollars.

...Read more about this and other Bunker Hill, IL historical stories at https://bunkerhillhistory.org/

--Cite this story: The Bunker Hill IL Historical Society. "A Look Back in Bunker Hill History." Bunker Hill Gazette-News, February 3, 2022.